Do all things
with kindness







Resources

Over the years, the SPCA has built up a wealth of information about animals and animal issues, some of which is shared below. You'll also find answers to common questions about pet care, as well as downloadable materials suitable for projects.

We speak for them

In South Africa animals – including wild animals, farm animals, those used for medical research and entertainment, and reptiles and birds in captivity – are protected by law against cruelty and negligence. However, many still suffer as a result of human apathy, ignorance, greed and disregard.

Below are some of the major issues being tackled by the SPCA:

Dog chaining
Despite the fact that it is illegal to confine a dog permanently by chaining, the practice is rife in Durban. Many unfortunate dogs spend their entire existence at the end of a chain, usually fastened directly around the neck. Being chained denies a dog every bit of natural  behaviour, such as running, playing and exploring. It also has damaging psychological effects that can lead to aggression. In many cases, chaining is accompanied by other  forms of cruelty, for example denying food and water, shelter and veterinary treatment.  

Our Inspectors regularly discover emaciated, mange-ridden and sometimes dead or dying dogs at the end of a chain. Neck injuries that have become necrotic (rotten) and riddled with maggots are also common. Sometimes a chain is put around a young pup’s neck and not adjusted as the dog grows; it literally grows into the neck.

Members of the public are urged to report cruelty to us by phoning 031 579-6500. You can remain anonymous if you wish.

Exotic pets
The SPCA is opposed to wild birds and animals such as snakes, lizards, monkeys, hedgehogs, etc being kept or bred as pets. Confining these animals in cages, usually without access to others of their kind, is cruel. Captive animals often die young as a result of being fed an incorrect diet or kept in an unsuitable habitat. Click here for more.

Poultry Industry
The poultry industry is one of the most wasteful and cruel intensive farming industries. Every year, millions of day old male chicks are tossed into trash bags to suffocate or thrown into macerators which literally shred them alive. For the female chicks that escape this end, life is even worse. The majority of those destined to produce our eggs end up as 'battery' hens – squashed together in cages with the space per bird equivalent to the size of an A4 sheet of paper.

Despite what you might believe, chickens are highly intelligent and social birds and this unnatural environment causes great distress. They are unable to stretch their wings, forage, preen or dust-bathe and they never see the sun. Over-crowding can make them aggressive towards each other and they are often de-beaked (removing a third of the bird’s beak with a red-hot blade) to prevent injuries. Broiler chickens (those farmed for their meat) are crammed into huge windowless sheds and pumped full of hormones to make them grow unnaturally quickly, so they can be slaughtered at 42 days. By that time, most are so obese that they can no longer walk.

The intense confinement and overcrowding on factory farms results in unimaginable filth and disease. The chickens are forced to breathe ammonia and dust from feces and feathers all day long. Many suffer from chronic respiratory diseases or “ammonia burn,” a painful eye condition.

The SPCA opposes this type of factory farming and urges members of the public to help create change by buying only free-range or barn eggs and chickens. Free-range hens have access to sunlight and grass pastures. Barn hens live inside but are not kept in cages. They have more space to move around in, including raised perches.

Feral cats
It's easy to confuse a feral cat with a stray cat, but whereas stray cats can be rehomed, feral or free-roaming cats may never adapt to living as pets in close contact with people. These animals typically live in a colony – a group of related cats – in a specific territory where food and shelter are available. Since feral cats typically avoid people, you may not even realise that they are living nearby.

These animals’ lives aren't easy without human caretakers. Females may become pregnant as young as five months of age and may have two to three litters a year. More than half of the kittens are likely to die without human intervention. Males who roam and fight to find mates and defend their territories may be injured and bites and scratches may become infected. Feral cats may cause a disturbance as a result of fighting and mating behavior, and be responsible for strong foul odours, flea infestations and the transmission of disease.

The SPCA endorses Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) a strategy for improving the health and quality of life of feral cats and reducing  their numbers. Feral cats who are TNRed are spayed or neutered so they can no longer reproduce, vaccinated against diseases, and surgically ear-tipped on one ear. Dedicated caretakers feed and provide shelter for the cats and monitor them for sickness. If you want to help feral cats, don't tempt them onto your property by leaving food out, as this could cause fighting between feral and domestic cats.

For more information on how to help feral cats, or to get help with feral cats, contact our Inspectorate on 031 5796500 or email info@spcadbn.org.za

Laboratory animals
Justification for animal testing and the results obtained are highly questionable both from a scientific and ethical perspective. Again, we urge people to force an end to this practice by buying products that are not tested on animals and which do not contain animal substances.

As much as we would like to believe that no research should ever be done on animals, this state of affairs is unlikely to become an immediate reality. We recognise that there will be a gradual transition period during which the role of the NSPCA will be to alleviate the suffering of laboratory animals.

Canned hunting
In South Africa, hunting of wild animals is deeply entrenched and plays a useful role in conservation – ensuring that populations of various species are kept at sustainable levels and providing funding for critical conservation projects. However, the recent death of Cecil the lion at the hands of a trophy hunter has highlighted the growing 'sport' of canned hunting.

Irrespective of the species hunted, this practice is regarded as unethical and the NSPCA requested Government to ban canned hunting in all its forms, as well as the breeding of any large predators for any other reason than bona fide conservation projects. It was further proposed that any form of hunting that does not involve a free-living and self sustaining animal with a fair chase and chance of escape should be considered canned.

Dog fighting
Although organised dog fighting is illegal in South Africa, there is a thriving underground movement – ranging from impromptu events in back alleys to carefully planned and organised fights with millions of rands riding on the outcome. The SPCA is totally opposed to this cruel 'sport' where dogs used for fighting and as 'bait' suffer horrific injuries and death.

Your questions about pet care answered by our veterinarian

What vaccinations should my puppy or kitten receive and at what age?
Both puppies and kittens should be vaccinated at 6 weeks of age. Pups need rabies, distemper, measles and a canine parvo virus vaccine. This provides temporary immunity and the pup should be vaccinated again 3 weeks later against rabies, distemper, hepatitis, kennel cough, canine parvo virus and leptospirosis and thereafter every year. Kittens should have a simultaneous vaccination against snuffles, rabies and cat ‘flu at 6 weeks. These vaccinations require a booster 3 weeks later and should be repeated on an annual basis.

What should I feed my dog or cat?
Dogs and cats need a well-balanced diet that includes protein, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals. Most commercial pet foods – both canned and dry – contain all the nutrients necessary for your pet’s well-being. Dry foods also help to keep the teeth clean. The amount your dog needs varies according to size, breed, age, and level of activity – check the packaging for the manufacturer’s recommendations. If in doubt, please consult your vet. Puppies and kittens particularly need careful feeding up until the age of about seven months. Cats can be very fussy eaters, so it’s a good idea to establish a regular feeding area and provide them with clean bowls and water. An occasional special treat like a chew is very good for keeping your pet's gums and teeth healthy.

I heard you shouldn't give a dog chocolate. Is this true?
Dogs like the taste of chocolate and will gobble it up. But it is highly poisonous to both cats and dogs and may result in death. This is because the cocoa in chocolate contains theobromine which they are unable to break down quickly. Cats are less prone to poisoning as they can’t taste the sweetness and are less likely to eat chocolate. Cooking chocolate is the most toxic, followed by dark and semi-sweet chocolate, milk chocolate, and lastly white chocolate. Chocolate cake and chocolate icing are also extremely toxic as they contain cocoa. Pet owners may assume their dog is unaffected after eating large quantities of chocolate as it can take several hours for symptoms to appear. Death can follow within 24 hours. If you suspect that your dog has eaten chocolate, take him directly to your vet.

Are there other ‘human’ foods that pets shouldn’t eat?
Onions, garlic, grapes and raisins are all poisonous to dogs and cats and can result in vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, pain, liver or kidney failure, coma and death. If you suspect your pet has eaten any of these foods, take it directly to your vet. Other foods to avoid are raw fish (which may contain tapeworm and have high levels of the enzyme thiaminase, resulting in a Vitamin B1 deficiency), canned tuna and bones (raw and cooked) which may cause choking or lacerations to/blockages of the gastrointestinal tract. Never offer your pet chicken or chop bones, as these are very brittle and shatter into sharp pieces. Do not give your cat milk, as some cats are unable to digest the lactose in cow's milk, which may lead to diarrhoea.

My dog/cat is overweight. How do I solve this problem?
Excess weight is a result of overfeeding and too little exercise, and this can lead to heart disease, liver problems and arthritis. You will need to cut down on the amount of food or put your pet on a special diet prescribed by your veterinarian. If you are feeding your pet correctly and it is still gaining weight, make sure it is not getting extra treats from your neighbours! Excessive weight gain may also be an indication of a hormonal imbalance, in which case you need to visit your vet.

Is it really necessary to take my dog for walks outside of the yard? And if so, how long should the walk be?
For optimum health, it is essential that you exercise your dog for about 30 minutes daily. Most dogs get far less exercise than they need which often leads to destructive behaviour. Research suggests that dog owners who regularly exercise their pets suffer less heart disease, so walking the dog is good for both you and your pet!

What grooming care does my dog need?
Apart from bathing, grooming such as brushing, nail clipping, ear, eye and teeth-cleaning, cutting/stripping the coat should be carried out regularly. Be sure to use a dog shampoo when bathing your dog as human shampoos may contain irritants.

At what age is appropriate to begin training my dog?
Training to respond to commands should commence as soon as possible with short, daily lessons. Reinforce correct behaviour with praise and by rewarding with tasty treats! Never hit a dog as punishment for failing to obey - rather withhold the reward to show your dissatisfaction. When issuing commands, use short words in a clear, precise tone of voice. Never vary these command words but do try to make the lessons fun for both of you!

How do I house-train my kitten?
You can teach a kitten as young as four weeks old to use a litter tray by immediately placing it in a litter tray as it begins to crouch. If a kitten relieves itself outside of the tray do not rub its nose in the mess - the odour will tell the kitten that this is its toilet and it will return to it.

How do I stop my cat from ripping up my furniture?
Provide scratching posts to stop kitty from ruining your furniture by scratching it. If your cat is allowed outdoors it will probably find a piece of bark on which to sharpen its claws, otherwise a vertical post covered in carpeting is ideal.

What Is sterilisation?
Sterilisation refers to the surgical removal of the reproductive organs – the ovaries and uterus in the female (called spaying) and the testicles in the male (called neutering). These procedures are performed at around six months of age.

Isn't it unfair to sterilise my pet?
Not at all - your pet is likely to be more relaxed, easier to train and less aggressive if it is not being driven by the strong urge to find a mate. Sterilisation also eliminates or reduces sexually-related behaviour such as spraying urine to mark their territory, straying to seek sexual partners, fighting and howling. There are also long-term health benefits for sterilised animals. Spayed females have a far lower incidence of mammary cancer, and pyometra (a serious, even life-threatening infection of the uterus) and ovarian cancers are completely eliminated. Testicular cancer in males is also eliminated. If all this is not enough to make you take your pet straight to the vet for sterilisation, consider this: In just 6 years, one female and her offspring can produce 67 000 dogs – only a quarter of which will find permanent loving homes. The rest are euthanased.

Won't my pet get fat after spaying?
Only too much food combined with too little exercise will make your pet fat. Remember most pets are sterilised near the end of their period of rapid growth when food intake needs are levelling off. If dogs are fed as though they are pups they will probably get fat regardless of whether they are spayed or neutered.

I've heard a dog should have a litter or at least come into season before being spayed.
There is no valid reason, medical or other, for doing so. If you allow your pet to have a litter you may be able to find homes for all the puppies or kittens - but you have no control over what happens to them or their future litters. Every year, the SPCA is forced to euthanise hundreds of healthy dogs and cats because there simply are not enough homes for them.

Why does the Durban & Coast SPCA not catch dogs on freeways?
This is the jurisdiction of Metro Police, who should be contacted on 031 361-0000. It is imperative that Metro Police are present as traffic usually has to be redirected. The SPCA will assist where possible.

How long does the Durban & Coast SPCA keep stray animals for?
Healthy animals are sheltered in the stray section for a 7 day period during which time the rightful owner has the opportunity to claim their pet. If the pet has not been claimed after this period, it will be transferred to the adoption section, where it may remain for weeks or even months. This will depend on the animal’s age, personality and the amount of space available.

What can be done about feral cats?
Traps can be hired from the Durban & Coast SPCA. Contact 031 579-6505 for more information. Cats and kittens may be brought to us for possible re-homing or to be sterilised and returned to the area in which they were found.

Can the Durban & Coast SPCA help with the problem of barking dogs?
No. This is the responsibility of Metro Police, as it is against municipal by-laws. Contact 031 361-0000.

How much does it cost to spay/neuter cats and dogs at the Durban & Coast SPCA?
You need to qualify to use the services of the Durban & Coast SPCA Animal Hospital (see below). A dog spay costs R770; dog neuter R530. A cat spay costs R560; a cat neuter R420. These prices are subject to change.

Do I qualify to use the SPCA clinic and hospital?
Unemployed and pensioned pet owners automatically qualify. Salaried pet owners are asked to fill in an income declaration form in order to determine if they earn enough to utilise the services of a private vet. Contact the Animal Hospital to see if you qualify: 031 579-6547.

Download SPCA posters




May 2018: When the 'last straw' is what we need

We’re talking about the last plastic straw, of course. Most are made from polypropylene (#5 plastic). It is identifiable by the resin identification Code 5, which is actually recyclable, although, it seems, not in the form of drinking straws.

It is the form of drinking straws that is the drawback. As small items like bottle tops and drinking straws proceed along conveyor belts in the recycling process, they tend to fall through the cracks and end up as landfill.

Polypropylene is “a highly recyclable plastic resin”, a byproduct of petroleum, a fossil fuel that requires a huge amount of energy to refine. The absence at present of programmes to recycle plastic straws is mainly owing to the costs involved. Plastic takes a formidable time to decompose. Plastic straws are estimated to take up to 200 years to decompose, with plastic lids probably taking 450-1000 years; while glass bottles top the list with an estimated decomposition period of up to one million years.

Sea creatures often fall victim to plastic dumped in the sea. Many of us have seen the video of a marine turtle with a straw penetrating far up into a nostril. The eight-minute video went viral and has been seen on UTube by over nine million viewers. Many sea creatures are slowly strangled to death or else have their innards painfully wound round with plastic.

It would obviously be helpful if people picked up plastic straws on beaches, but even more helpful if we did not use them at all and went back to paper straws. These go back to the 1880s when a man named Marvin Stone glued strips of paper together and wound them into a ‘straw’ instead of sipping drinks through a hollow stalk of rye grass, which was commonly used until then. Paper straws remained popular until the 1960s when plastic straws took over. It is estimated that about 500 million plastic straws are used and discarded in America every day.

It seems that we are exposed to tiny specks of plastic in our tap and bottled water, and it is not yet known what effects this intake of chemicals has on the body. This also raises a question about the presence of plastic in fish. Refer to Health-E News on the Internet for details of research.

Mamba rescued in Mayville
The Berea Mail reported a mamba incident in Mayville early in April. A householder heard his two days barking in his courtyard and found them attacking a snake that had backed up against a wall. His pitbull cross was biting at the snake’s tail. The reptile then managed to slither away and slid under a concrete braai. It did not reappear.

The following morning, the householder found that his pitbull had died during the night. He had not realised that it had been bitten. He called Nick Evans of KZN Amphibian and Reptile Conservation and asked if he would come around if the snake was seen again. Within minutes, his other dog began barking at the corner of the house. The householder, not expecting to see the snake again, found it hiding behind a concrete drain and the gutter pipe, which was sheltered by the braai stand.

Nick Evans arrived and, with the second dog safely locked away, went looking for the snake. He said that snakes often die after a dog bite because the spine is frequently broken. He removed the snake and found that its tail was moving, which meant that its spine was not broken, but it had some severe puncture wounds and was still bleeding quite freely.

Nick took the injured mamba to Carol Schloms of uShaka’s Dangerous Creatures exhibit. Carl cleaned and medicated the wounds and put the snake in a clean dry container which was kept in a dark place for a few days while the snake recovered until it was well enough to be released in a natural area well away from people or buildings.

Do not try to kill snakes as a reaction to fear of them. Many of us have snakes in our gardens without ever knowing that they are there. If anyone is fearful when finding a snake, Nick will safely re-locate it. Contact him on 072 809 5806. For snake educational work and queries, e-mail nickevanskzn@gmail.com.

Unconditional love
Pets are great for our mental and physical health. Caring for an animal gives us a greater sense of purpose and meaningfulness.

“For the most part, pets just want to love and be loved. Studies have shown that just ten minutes of interacting with dogs can raise oxytocin levels, the body hormone that makes us feel more calm and connected. And less lonely.” (Alison Stone)

We release oxytocin through direct contact with others, so if you are isolated or depressed, having a pet can help to dissipate such feelings. Most retirement establishments do not allow people to have pets. It would be really good to see such establishments taking on a couple of dogs themselves. This would make an inestimable difference to many residents. Labradors are among the many suitable breeds.

There will always be residents who are not suffering any disablement who will be willing to walk dogs. Dogs just have that special something that raises the spirits. They offer bountiful love and respond joyously to being loved back. Their tails wag at the slightest attention or even at one’s presence. They have highly developed consciousness and are intuitive, sociable and responsive. Many people are cat-lovers, and cats are usually easy pets. People are happier and far less likely to feel lonely when there are animals around. When a retirement establishment adopts a couple of pets, it sends such a warm message.

EU victory for bee protectors and for the environment
It took seven years of dedicated action, but Avaaz and its millions of supporters across the world have succeeded in getting pesticides banned from agricultural use in the EU. Well over five million people from all over the world signed the Avaaz petition, and more than $2.5 million was donated to Avaaz’s bee campaigning and research.

Many farmers were anti-ban, so Avaaz stepped up efforts to bring together organic and conventional pro-ban farmers and also worked closely with the European Commission. The campaign began way back in 2011 in France when one million Avaazers tried to persuade France to lead by declaring a ban They were supported by the French Minister of the Environment, Nicolas Hulot, who has been at the forefront of the efforts to ban neonics across the EU. Neonics refers to neoncutinoids, a type of insecticide that has been used for about twenty years, especially against sap-feeding insects. Pollinators like bees are estimated to pollinate about 70 of the top 100 crops that feed 90% of the world. Germany followed France in banning pesticides that killed bees, and last year the UK joined them. One by one, several smaller EU countries followed, including the Netherlands and Greece.

The shift is from pesticides to a new model of agroecology food production which is in harmony with nature. Agroecology is the study of ecological processes involved in agriculture. The message is clear: if we want things to change for the better, we have to care enough to speak up. This is a message we all need to take to heart. Never look the other way when speaking up could help make a difference. Parents and teachers have a seminal role to play here.

Previous editions

Click to download in pdf format

May 2018
March 2018
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
December 2015
October 2015
September 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015


Click the cover to download the Animal Angle magazine

Animal Angle

December 2016

Animal Angle

December 2015

For kids

Do you love animals and want to be their friend? You can find out more about dogs, cats, hamsters and snakes here and how to look after them properly. Sometimes, people do things that hurt animals by mistake, because they don't know any better or they believe stories like cutting a dog's tongue to get rid of worms. This is not true - worms live in your dog's digestive system and cutting his tongue will cause him a lot of pain without doing any good.

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  • Caring for your dog

A dog needs regular exercise and plenty of opportunities to walk and run. Most enjoy playing with toys, people and other dogs. Favourite toys are balls, an old shoe and rope-type toys for tug-of-war games! Dogs can't use toothpaste and toothbrushes to clean their teeth – they need crunchy dog chunks or other chewable treats to keep their teeth clean and strong. Don't share your chocolate bar with your dog - it could make him very sick – and always make sure he has fresh water to drink. This is especially important on hot summer days and when you get back after taking him for a walk.



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  • Caring for your cat

Cats naturally use objects to scratch, to mark their territory, strengthen their muscles and sharpen their claws. If your cat lives mostly inside, get him a scratching post (or make one for him out of a piece of wood covered in an old carpet) so he doesn't ruin the furniture. Never shout at your cat or punish him for doing something wrong as he can't really understand and will just become scared of you. Cats need meat or fish-based food and cannot live on a vegetarian diet. Never give your cat onions, garlic, raisins, grapes or chocolate, as these are poisonous to them. Many cats will not eat if their food is placed too close to their toilet site or litter box.



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  • Hamsters, rats and mice

Owning a pet rodent can be fun, especially if you're not allowed a bigger pet like a dog or cat – but it is a big responsibility, since a caged animal cannot find its own food and water if you forget. Most rodents are active at night and may make a noise when you are trying to sleep. Their cage needs to be cleaned thoroughly once a week and you should remove damp litter every couple of days. It's good to let your hamster, rat or mouse out of the cage now and again, but keep a close watch on it as these creatures can 'disappear' into unlikely places where they could be at risk from other pets, electric cables, toxic household cleaners and open containers of liquid.



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  • Keeping snakes, lizards and other exotic pets

Captivity causes an unnatural life of misery for exotic birds and animals – snakes, lizards, hedgehogs and other non-domesticated animals – and the SPCA is opposed to them being kept or bred as pets. Many people who keep such pets are not able to provide the correct food; they may not realise how big the animal will grow or how long it may live - and the health issues that might affect it. Just because snakes, lizards and fish are 'cold blooded' does not mean they don't feel pain, fear and anxiety if they don't have places to hide. For more information on exotic animals, click here.



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  • Danger of fireworks

Fireworks are fun and exciting, but the ones with long bangs are terrifying to many dogs, cats and other pets. This is because your dog has much better hearing than you do - sounds are five times louder to him – and your cat's hearing is even more acute. Cats can hear a grasshopper eating! Dogs may also chase a firecracker that's thrown which can cause terrible injuries to its mouth if the firework explodes in its mouth. Keep your pets inside when fireworks are being set alight in your neighbourhood and give them something to eat or play with to distract them.



A fun game for you

See if you can help the fish find his way to the cave first time!



Useful Links

You can find out more about animals and animal issues at these websites:

PETA – People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

This UK-based charity is dedicated to establishing and protecting the rights of all animals. Like humans, animals are capable of suffering and have interests in leading their own lives; therefore, they are not ours to use ... for food, clothing, experimentation, entertainment or any other reason.

Meat free Mondays

Launched by Paul, Mary and Stella McCartney in 2009, Meat Free Monday is a not-for-profit campaign which aims to raise awareness of the detrimental environmental impact of eating meat, and to encourage people to help slow climate change, preserve precious natural resources and improve their health by having at least one meat free day each week.

Humane Education Trust

The website is a very fine source of material – not only giving valuable information about pets and farm animals, but teaching compassion. They are happy to help learners and their schools. If your school would like to subscribe to their newsletter, which also has lots of pictures, ask your teacher to write to:
Humane Education News
P O Box 825
Somerset West
7129

Certified Humane

Wouldn’t you feel good to see animal welfare labels on foodstuffs? In America, in 2003, a label was launched that told buyers that they were buying healthy meat from animals that had enjoyed good lives and had been provided with shelter, good resting places and plenty of space to let them live as naturally as possible. A project that included information on this American “Certified Humane Raised and Handled” label would be a valuable piece of work, as you could answer all the questions about why having the label matters, what it means to animals’ lives, and how it helps the planet.

Compassion in World Farming

This organisation works hard to get a better deal for farm animals. You’ll find lots of information about factory farming and how it affects the lives of these animals.

How you can get involved

If you love animals, please support our efforts to protect them from cruelty and neglect. There are lots of different ways to help.

Sponsor a Yard Cat

Provide care and shelter for one of the cats that live permanently at our SPCA because they cannot be re-homed – with your monthly sponsorship gift of just R150.

Volunteer

Volunteering is an enriching experience for anyone who has some free time on a regular basis and wants to make a difference. You need to be over 16 years of age, reliable and have your own transport.

Get a MySchool Card

It costs you nothing, and you'll help animals every time you swipe the card at Woolworths and other participating stores. Be sure to nominate Durban & Coast SPCA as the beneficiary. Download the app from the Apple store or Google play, or click the button to sign up online.

Donate in lieu of a gift

Helping to make a better world for animals is the perfect way to honour a friend or loved one who prefers not to receive gifts for a birthday, anniversary or other celebration.

Support Coffee Cats

Enjoy a cuppa or a light meal in the tranquil setting of our cafe and tea garden. Meet our famous yard cats, browse plants for sale, visit our charity shop or Adoption Centre.

Include us in your Will

If kindness towards animals has been one of the guiding principles of your life, wouldn’t you enjoy knowing that your voice against cruelty, neglect, greed and ignorance will continue to be heard beyond your lifetime?

Donate unwanted items

Your unwanted furniture, clothing, household appliances, books, jewellery, etc can be sold in our charity shop to raise funds towards the care of our furry orphans. We also appreciate gifts of pet food, blankets, etc.

Collect small change for us

If you own or manage a retail outlet or are a member of a club, why not keep one of our collection tins on your counter? Small change mounts up quickly and makes a big difference to our Society!

Shop til you drop

We have a charity shop filled with amazing bargains, as well as a section of brand new pet products – collars & leads, tick & flea remedies, grooming products, toys & pet food.

Buy plants

Fill your garden with beautiful healthy seedlings, shrubs and trees supplied by Ladybird Landscapes. Large selection available at our nursery, adjacent to Coffee Cats.

Participate in our events

Throughout the year we run a series of competitions and events – from a fantastic trail run along the Umgeni River, annual golf day, sushi night and regular flea markets and second hand book sales. You'll also find us at the ECR House & Garden Show.

Report cruelty

Animals can't speak for themselves - they need compassionate people to speak for them. If you know of an animal that is being ill treated or neglected, call us on 031 579 6501 or our emergency after hours number, 083 212 6103.



Amanzimtoti: 031 904 2424/5

Dolphin Coast (Ballito): 087 550 0512 /083 653 0127 (Emergencies)

Dundee & District: 034 212 2851

Empangeni: 034 792 9129/078 306 1439 (Emergencies)

Eshowe: 035 474 4169

Estcourt: 36 352 1476/083 555 9758 (Emergencies)

Greytown: 033 413 1181/033 413 1522

Howick: 033 330 4557/033 330 2672

Kloof & Highway: 031 764 1212

SPCA Inspector

Kokstad: 082 771 7229

Lower South Coast: 039 312 0962

Mooi River & District: 033 263 1526

Newcastle: 034 318 2346

Phoenix (Avonford Crescent) : 031 500 6452

Pietermaritzburg: 033 386 9267/8/9

Richards Bay: 035 753 2086

Sani: 033 702 1884